McLovin’s Work

This is not a complete list but it reflects the products that I’m the most proud of (in reverse chronological order):

Action.IO

This is the most ambitious project I’ve been part of and I’m proud to be doing this with some incredibly talented people who also happen to be my close friends. From what was just a random idea in March 2012 to being a company building a platform-as-a-service that will change the way developers work, it’s been an incredible journey so far and long may it continue. I work mostly on the backend/ops side of things and working with/on some great tools such as ansible, node.js, sensu, graphite, ec2, rails, redis and others.

Journey (Path for Mac)

The original intent was to do something cool during our weekly hackathon and build a Mac app for Path. The result was a week long drama that eventually triggered a Congressional hearing about privacy in mobile social networks. We persevered nonetheless, built a sweet little Mac app, visited Path’s swanky office in San Francisco and met the team.

Denso/Vidyou

What started off as a hackathon project in May 2011 became a promising product - ultimately it proved to be an idea which was outside our wheelhouse especially when it involved such old chestnuts such as content licensing, fighting copyright infringement claims and the like. This was my first foray into building a truly social app on multiple platforms such as the web, iOS and Android. With a little more luck the product would have been a part of a bigger media entity but it wasn’t to be.

Today’s News

This will hold a special place in my heart as my first serious iOS app. The concept was heavily inspired by Simon Gyford’s Today’s Guardian, and the app eventually had legs to be a mini-publishing platform. I invested a lot of time to get performance just right on both the ipad and the iPhone and the end result was our first tech crunch coverage.

Wego.com

This was another ambitious project where we converted an aging and unscalable j2EE app and built a modern, modular app powered by rails on the front end and plenty of ruby services on the backend. I did make a few bad decisions in hindsight but I had a blast building a complex app in time for the big wego.com rebranding in May 2008 with some great people.